What is the FDA Definition of the Healthy Food Label?

The FDA defines the “healthy” food label as any food that:

– Contains no more than 3 grams of fat

– Is low in sodium

– Is high in fiber

– Is low in sugar

– Is high in protein

The FDA’s definition of a “healthy” food label is based on the latest scientific evidence and is meant to help guide consumers towards making healthier choices.

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Introduction

The FDA defines the term “healthy” in two ways. One definition is based on a food’s content, and the other is based on its intended use.

A food is considered “healthy” if it meets one of the following two definitions:

A food that contains 3 grams or less of total fat per serving and 1 gram or less of saturated fat per serving and no more than 130 mg of cholesterol per serving and no more than 480 mg of sodium per serving.

OR

A food for which at least half of the calories come from fat and that contains no more than 5 grams of fat, 2 grams of saturated fat, and 0 grams of trans fat per reference amount customarily consumed (RACC).

What is the FDA?

The FDA is the acronym for the United States Food and Drug Administration. This regulatory agency is responsible for ensuring that food and drug products are safe for human consumption. In order to protect consumers, the FDA has established guidelines that food manufacturers must follow in order to list their products as “healthy.”

What is the FDA’s Definition of the Healthy Food Label?

The FDA’s definition of the healthy food label is as follows: “The label of a food product that makes a nutrient content claim or a health claim that characterizes the level of a nutrient in the food shall, as a part of such claim, include: (i) The percent Daily Value (%DV) of the nutrient per reference amount customarily consumed (RACC); and (ii) The number of calories per RACC.

How to Use the Healthy Food Label

The FDA’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that people aged two and over consume less than 2,300 mg of sodium per day. The “Healthy” food label provides guidance on food products that are lower in sodium, as well as calories, saturated and trans fats, and cholesterol.

When looking at the “Healthy” food label, pay attention to the % Daily Value (%DV) next to each nutrient. This is the percentage of that nutrient that a person should consume in a day, based on a 2,000 calorie diet. For example, if a product has 5% DV or less of sodium, this means that one serving of the product contains 5% or less of the amount of sodium a person should consume in a day. If a product has 20% DV or more of sodium, this means that one serving of the product contains 20% or more of the amount of sodium a person should consume in a day. The FDA recommends that people limit their daily intake of sodium to 2,300 mg, so products with 20% DV or more of sodium are high in sodium.

Conclusion

In order to make an informed decision about the food we eat, it is important to understand what the FDA’s definition of the healthy food label is. The FDA defines the healthy food label as follows: “The term ‘healthy’ can be used on food labels only if the food does not contain any trans fat, and if it has less than 0.5 grams of saturated fat per serving. In addition, ‘healthy’ foods must not have more than 480 milligrams of sodium per serving, and must contain no more than 6 grams of sugar per serving.”

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